Posts Tagged ‘royal exchange’

Leaving the Lights On

I’m at the Royal Exchange for Happy Days. When the play starts, the lights don’t go down, the doors stay open, even the exit signs stay on. A baby crawls towards the water next to the rotating hillock in which Maxine Peake sits, and I wonder how deep it is.  Maxine directs her next line… Continue Reading →

Making Three Sisters Relevant for Today

I can’t say I’m a Chekhov fan. Yes, I loved Uncle Vanya at HOME last year, which I described as ‘a thing of sparse beauty’. But I struggle to see what many of the plays mean to us today. My copy of Chekhov’s ‘Five Plays’ has sat on the bookshelf for five years unthumbed. But… Continue Reading →

Frankensteins

Two hundred years after writing, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein appears to be more relevant today than at any other point. We are on the verge of creating beings in our image, whether through genetics, bioengineering or Artificial Intelligence. We will face the challenge over how to control our creations, just as Frankenstein did. And in a… Continue Reading →

Why does the Bruntwood Prize matter?

Yesterday the winners of the 2017 Bruntwood Prize were announced at a ceremony at the Royal Exchange.  In effect there were six winners; an overall Prize Winner, three Judges Awards and two plays selected for development support.  It is likely we will see at least four of these performed at the Royal Exchange either in… Continue Reading →

Jubilee

I like what the Royal Exchange are doing at the moment, the way they are experimenting with not only subject matter but also form, for example Parliament Square.  Jubilee, directed by Chris Goode, continues that trajectory, bringing to the main stage a play full of subversion and devised theatre, sexual diversity and violence. It’s always… Continue Reading →