#JeSuis

#JeSuis, at Contact Manchester as part of Journeys Festival, is described by its choreographer as a work in progress, a platform for each of the seven performers to tell a unique story where the individual stories will evolve with real events.  ‘It’s like an onion’, says Aakash Odedra, ‘multifaceted, multi dynamic, there is no one… Continue Reading →

The Believers Are But Brothers

Javaad Alipoor’s The Believers Are But Brothers is an incredibly complex show that delves into the world of disenfranchised men, especially young Muslims.  He stands at a microphone and tells the stories of three men, two in the UK, one in the US.  He engages with the audience and discusses the reality of global politics; the… Continue Reading →

How To Save the World Without Really Trying

Orbit Festival at HOME continues with How To Save the World Without Really Trying by Bourgeois & Maurice.  This is an exploration of current affairs through clever song and incisive narrative.  Cabaret, if you will.  For Georgeois Bourgeois, the spotlight is always on himself, but his singing voice justifies this; his is the highly emotional… Continue Reading →

Instructions for a Border Crossing

Daniel Bye’s Instructions for Border Crossing is a fascinating and in some ways remarkable piece of theatre.  At HOME as part of the Orbit Festival, this is a play about borders. Why does oppression increase the closer we approach a border? Daniel sits at a desk opposite an empty chair to which he periodically invites… Continue Reading →

Kissing the Shotgun Goodnight

I suppose how you react to Chris Brett Bailey’s new show Kissing the Shotgun Goodnight, at Contact Manchester, depends on your expectations as you enter the theatre.  If you loved This is How We Die (which I think most people did, review here), you’ll be expecting a text based performance with a degree of very… Continue Reading →