Posts Under ‘Large Theatre’ Category

The Fishermen

I make no secret of my general contempt for stage adaptations of books, with their clunky drama shoehorned into condensed narrative. Yet I have talked before about why I think storytelling, as opposed to drama/conflict driven performances, can produce more effective theatre. The Fishermen proves once and for all that a clever adaptation of a… Continue Reading →

Leaving the Lights On

I’m at the Royal Exchange for Happy Days. When the play starts, the lights don’t go down, the doors stay open, even the exit signs stay on. A baby crawls towards the water next to the rotating hillock in which Maxine Peake sits, and I wonder how deep it is.¬† Maxine directs her next line… Continue Reading →

Poetry along the Bridgewater Canal

If you live in Central Manchester you may well have missed some of the excellent performance and arts events as part of est.1761, designed to inspire and engage local communities with the story of the Bridgewater Canal, including Take Me to the Bridgewater¬†last year in partnership with Blast Theory. Later this year textile artist Sally… Continue Reading →

Brighton Rock

I’ve always thought it was a tricky ask to put classic literature on the stage. Sometimes it becomes too heavy, too narrative driven. At the other extreme it becomes too detached from the original, perhaps through redrawing character or excessive physical theatre. But Pilot Theatre’s production of Brighton Rock at the Lowry as part of… Continue Reading →

Making Three Sisters Relevant for Today

I can’t say I’m a Chekhov fan. Yes, I loved Uncle Vanya at HOME last year, which I described as ‘a thing of sparse beauty’. But I struggle to see what many of the plays mean to us today. My copy of Chekhov’s ‘Five Plays’ has sat on the bookshelf for five years unthumbed. But… Continue Reading →