Posts Under ‘Large Theatre’ Category

War with the Newts

You could probably watch the eighty minutes of War with the Newts (which I saw in the Royal Exchange studio) and enjoy it for the well told story, the immersive style staging, the technical aspects and the attention to detail. Not to mention some very impressive acting and the well paced writing. Because it is… Continue Reading →

Queen Margaret

The history of our world often consigns the role of women to mere supporting cast. Think of Camille Claudel who probably sculpted many of Rodin’s most important works. So it is with Queen Margaret, pushed into the background of four of Shakespeare’s plays and yet a dominant force of both the politics and the battles… Continue Reading →

OthelloMacbeth

What happens when you cut Shakespeare to an hour and twenty minutes? Twice? And try to link two plays together? This is what OthelloMacbeth at HOME does. The design dominates Othello, stainless steel panels on the rear wall coming far forward so that the action is pushed right to the front of the stage. This… Continue Reading →

The Fishermen

I make no secret of my general contempt for stage adaptations of books, with their clunky drama shoehorned into condensed narrative. Yet I have talked before about why I think storytelling, as opposed to drama/conflict driven performances, can produce more effective theatre. The Fishermen proves once and for all that a clever adaptation of a… Continue Reading →

Leaving the Lights On

I’m at the Royal Exchange for Happy Days. When the play starts, the lights don’t go down, the doors stay open, even the exit signs stay on. A baby crawls towards the water next to the rotating hillock in which Maxine Peake sits, and I wonder how deep it is.  Maxine directs her next line… Continue Reading →