We’re Not Really Here

We’re Not Really Here (at Contact) sets out to explore the individual and group dynamics of football supporters.  This is a great example of using an unusual form very effectively to tell a specific story.  Co-creator Yahya terryn says ‘I’m interested in why people are there, to understand why people go to the football’.  We, the audience,… Continue Reading →

Our Town

Thornton Wilder’s 1938 play Our Town searches for the beauty in the mundane. It shows us that we should celebrate routine, family, the tiny moments that we call life, that so often pass us by within our ambition and haste to achieve. Set in a small town both physically and metaphorically, this is a perfect… Continue Reading →

Hull – It’s Different for Girls

I’ve made the trip over to Beverley near Hull, to the wonderful East Riding Theatre.  Hull is UK City of Culture and I promised myself I’d make the trip this year – there’s a lot going on and it’s a city well worth getting to know again.  Also, two of Manchester’s talented actors – Abey… Continue Reading →

The Wedding

The Wedding feels quite different from the other Gecko shows I’ve seen (Overcoat, Institute, Dreamer).  There’s less of the usual warmth, and it’s more episodic, broken up into discrete chunks as opposed to a coherent narrative, perhaps more reminiscent of ‘street theatre’.  It feels bigger, focusing on groups of people rather than allowing us to engage… Continue Reading →

Letters to Morrissey

It is perhaps critical to the themes of this play that it’s set before the rise of the internet celebrity, in what might naively be referred to as a better time.  Of vinyl.  Of letters sent by post.  A time where there was no expectation of instant gratification.  Of old fashioned school violence.  But of… Continue Reading →