Queen Margaret

The history of our world often consigns the role of women to mere supporting cast. Think of Camille Claudel who probably sculpted many of Rodin’s most important works. So it is with Queen Margaret, pushed into the background of four of Shakespeare’s plays and yet a dominant force of both the politics and the battles… Continue Reading →

OthelloMacbeth

What happens when you cut Shakespeare to an hour and twenty minutes? Twice? And try to link two plays together? This is what OthelloMacbeth at HOME does. The design dominates Othello, stainless steel panels on the rear wall coming far forward so that the action is pushed right to the front of the stage. This… Continue Reading →

The Roundabout

What must it be like to see theatre for the very first time in the Roundabout? Pitched in the middle of a park, it’s a bit like a small big top except that’s it’s yellow and hemispherical. You enter down a dark entrance to the side of the stage and there is anticipation, then you’re… Continue Reading →

Watching theatre in a language that is not your own

Tonight I’m seeing a play in German. Before it even starts I’ve bought a programme for another performance in the same building because my German isn’t really up to this. But that’s OK, it’s only €1.50 and I’m interested in how different theatres put together their programmes. Anyway I’m early and need something to read…. Continue Reading →

The Fishermen

I make no secret of my general contempt for stage adaptations of books, with their clunky drama shoehorned into condensed narrative. Yet I have talked before about why I think storytelling, as opposed to drama/conflict driven performances, can produce more effective theatre. The Fishermen proves once and for all that a clever adaptation of a… Continue Reading →